Best States to Live in the US in 2021: Top 10 States for Quality of Life (Global Report + Statistics & Facts)

For those wondering if they’re living in one of the best states in the USA, here is what the data has to say. Of course, personal preference is a factor to consider, and people should live wherever they want. Still, for families who want to move to a statistically safe place with a high quality of life, they can turn to the hard numbers.

Brad Smith

Brad Smith - Editorial Staff

Updated: May 5, 2021

Best States to Live in Map

For those wondering if they’re living in one of the best states in the USA, here is what the data has to say. Of course, personal preference is a factor to consider, and people should live wherever they want. Still, for families who want to move to a statistically safe place with a high quality of life, they can turn to the hard numbers.

Below is what the research says about the best state to live in the U.S. based on several different criteria. Keep in mind that these metrics are from 2021. They’re the latest results from reports like the U.S. Census review and other national polls. The findings are below, so take some time to check out which states offer the highest quality of life.

Comparison of Key Metrics Among Top 50 States

Below is an easy-to-read visual review of the top statistics covered in this guide. Here is where people can compare things like safety and quality of life for each of the places on the list. This simple chart can serve as a report of the most important factors that families consider when moving across the country.

Population density Median income Median Home value Violent crime Jobless rate Bachelors degree Health outcomes Poverty rate Air incidents Poor roads
UtahUtah 3,205,958 $68,358 $401,053 7,553 3.3% 32.5% 6 9.0% 0 2.4%
New HampshireNew Hampshire 1,359,711 $73,381 $330,976 2,074 3.8% 36.0% 17 7.2% 10 4.8%
MassachusettsMassachusetts 6,892,503 $77,385 $474,673 22,578 8.4% 42.1% 2 9.9% 42 15.4%
MarylandMaryland 6,045,680 $80,776 $341,148 27,456 6.8% 39.0% 8 8.9% 9 9.2%
ColoradoColorado 5,758,736 $69,117 $442,766 21,938 6.9% 39.4% 9 9.6% 72 5.9%
WashingtonWashington 7,614,893 $70,979 $470,304 22,377 6.3% 34.5% 13 10.1% 15 10.7%
VirginiaVirginia 8,535,519 $71,535 $307,964 17,753 5.6% 37.6% 21 10.1% 35 2.7%
MinnesotaMinnesota 5,639,632 $68,388 $283,127 13,332 4.7% 34.8% 7 9.2% 37 4.1%
North DakotaNorth Dakota 762,062 $61,843 $239,464 2,169 4.7% 28.9% 16 10.2% 0 2.2%
VermontVermont 623,989 $57,513 $277,364 1,262 3.5% 36.8% 12 10.5% 0 3.5%
New JerseyNew Jersey 8,882,190 $80,088 $376,866 18,375 7.7% 38.1% 4 9.8% 38 16.8%
ConnecticutConnecticut 3,565,287 $74,168 $288,822 6,546 8.2% 38.4% 3 9.7% 22 6.2%
HawaiiHawaii 1,415,872 $77,765 $683,470 4,042 10.3% 32.0% 1 9.3% 5 16.1%
South Dakota 884,659 $56,521 $225,662 3,530 3.3% 27.8% 24 12.3% 1 4.6%
WyomingWyoming 578,759 $60,434 $262,517 1,258 5.2% 26.7% 25 10.7% 7 1.9%
New YorkNew York 19,453,561 $64,894 $350,545 69,764 8.7% 35.3% 10 13.9% 10 13.4%
WisconsinWisconsin 5,822,434 $59,305 $213,537 17,070 4.0% 29.0% 33 10.9% 11 11.1%
IdahoIdaho 1,787,065 $52,225 $348,483 4,000 3.8% 26.8% 14 11.9% 4 2.8%
MontanaMontana 1,068,778 $53,386 $324,813 4,328 4.2% 30.7% 41 12.4% 6 3.5%
DelawareDelaware 973,764 $62,852 $284,787 4,115 5.9% 31.0% 35 11.1% 11 3.9%
FloridaFlorida 21,477,737 $52,594 $270,560 81,270 5.1% 28.5% 27 13.1% 106 1.3%
OregonOregon 4,217,737 $60,212 $402,573 11,995 6.3% 32.3% 19 12.4% 12 3.1%
North CarolinaNorth Carolina 10,488,084 $52,752 $225,740 38,995 6.1% 29.9% 31 13.7% 107 3.3%
NebraskaNebraska 1,934,408 $59,970 $192,584 5,821 3.4% 30.6% 20 10.6% 0 6.4%
MaineMaine 1,344,212 $56,277 $276,023 1,548 5.0% 30.3% 23 11.3% 0 7.3%
AlaskaAlaska 731,545 $73,181 $292,066 6,343 6.3% 29.0% 11 10.6% 44 18.7%
Rhode IslandRhode Island 1,059,361 $63,870 $340,811 2,342 7.9% 33.0% 18 11.9% 11 24.6%
CaliforniaCalifornia 39,512,223 $71,805 $624,977 174,331 9.3% 32.6% 5 13.0% 118 16.9%
PennsylvaniaPennsylvania 12,801,989 $59,195 $215,939 39,228 7.1% 30.1% 34 12.0% 280 7.1%
GeorgiaGeorgia 10,617,423 $56,183 $223,945 36,170 5.3% 29.9% 37 14.1% 93 2.8%
ArizonaArizona 7,278,717 $56,581 $315,554 33,141 6.8% 28.4% 29 13.9% 0 3.1%
MissouriMissouri 6,137,428 $53,578 $180,253 30,380 4.4% 28.2% 38 13.1% 0 2.2%
IowaIowa 3,155,070 $58,570 $158,930 8,410 3.7% 27.7% 15 11.0% 38 7.5%
NevadaNevada 3,080,156 $58,003 $332,501 15,210 8.2% 23.7% 30 12.1% 10 1.3%
KansasKansas 2,913,314 $56,422 $167,540 11,968 4.7% 32.3% 26 11.6% 47 1.3%
IllinoisIllinois 12,671,821 $62,992 $219,806 51,561 8.0% 33.4% 28 12.4% 103 6.9%
OhioOhio 11,689,100 $54,021 $168,226 34,269 5.6% 27.2% 39 13.6% 193 5.8%
TexasTexas 28,995,881 $59,206 $224,466 121,474 6.9% 28.7% 22 13.7% 176 5.5%
MichiganMichigan 9,986,857 $54,909 $192,093 43,686 8.2% 28.1% 40 14.0% 108 7.6%
IndianaIndiana 6,732,219 $54,181 $172,769 24,966 4.6% 25.3% 36 12.8% 309 3.4%
AlabamaAlabama 4,903,185 $48,123 $158,809 25,046 4.7% 24.5% 48 16.1% 23 2.1%
KentuckyKentucky 4,467,673 $48,375 $160,589 9,701 5.6% 23.2% 46 16.7% 11 2.3%
New MexicoNew Mexico 2,096,829 $46,744 $229,947 17,450 8.6% 26.9% 31 18.6% 3 3.0%
South CarolinaSouth Carolina 5,148,714 $50,570 $206,647 26,323 5.6% 27.0% 42 14.1% 61 4.4%
TennesseeTennessee 6,829,174 $51,340 $207,727 40,647 5.6% 26.1% 44 14.4% 78 2.4%
OklahomaOklahoma 3,956,971 $50,051 $141,933 17,086 4.5% 24.8% 43 15.0% 81 5.3%
MississippiMississippi 2,976,149 $43,529 $134,125 8,272 6.6% 21.3% 49 19.8% 37 6.0%
ArkansasArkansas 3,017,804 $45,869 $142,070 17,643 4.9% 22.0% 47 16.4% 32 6.3%
West VirginiaWest Virginia 1,792,147 $43,469 $113,626 5,674 6.7% 19.9% 45 17.5% 11 4.8%
LouisianaLouisiana 4,648,794 $49,973 $178,987 25,537 7.9% 23.4% 50 18.8% 5 9.1%

How We Figured Out Which Were the Best States To Live In 2021

To find the best states to live in the USA, it was important to compile data from reputable resources. The information came from organizations like the U.S. Department of Labor and the FBI, as well as federal and national government entities like the Environmental Protection Agency, The Tax Foundation, the U.S. Census Bureau, and the United Health Foundation. Once all of the data was pulled, it was time to sort everything and decide which key metrics were most crucial.

Google Spreadsheet Best States To Live In Comparison [Full Report]

Best State to Live in Review Process

In the Analysis of Each State, We Ranked Them on These Top 10 Key Criteria:

  1. Population Density (the higher the better)
  2. Median Income, $
  3. Median Home Value Index, $
  4. Crime Rate (Violent Crime, Robbery, Murder, Burglary etc.)
  5. Unemployment Rate, %
  6. Education Rate, %
  7. Medicine Rate (behaviors, community & environment, policy, clinical care, health outcomes)
  8. Poverty Rate, %
  9. Natural Environment Rate (air, drinking water, hazardous waste, pesticides, water)
  10. Infrastructure Rate (roads in poor condition, structurally deficient bridge, state highway spending per driver, avg. travel time to work)

1. Population Density (the higher, the better)

Several of the states on this list have some of the highest population densities in the country. This means they have large percentages of people within a given area. Those who want wider, open spaces should keep that statistic in mind when looking for a state to move to.

2. Median Income, $ (the higher, the better)

The higher the income per state, the better quality of life people will have. Plus, to calculate this metric, taxes have been considered. These are the sales, the state individual, the corporate income, and the property tax. So, the fewer taxes, the higher the ranking each state will have.

3. Median Home Value Index, $ (the higher the better)

States with a more prominent average home value are more likely to have access to decent education, less crime, and more working opportunities. Plus, many of the states on this list have a hot housing market right now.

4. Crime Rate (the lower, the better)

We looked at the overall data for each of the 50 states. Then, we summarized each individual state based on the more detailed metrics. This included the rate of violent crime, robbery, motor vehicle theft, etc. These statistics included findings from the FBI data and other governmental agencies to get accurate readings on crime throughout the country.

5. Unemployment Rate, % (the lower, the better)

Another metric where people want the number to be lower is unemployment. The United States ranges from 3.3% up to 10.3% in terms of unemployed populations. This data came from the Bureau of Labor Statistics and reflected 2021 findings. A lack of jobs can translate to a sluggish economy, lower-quality housing, and decreased health.

6. Education Rate, % (the higher, the better)

This statistic looks at the percentage of citizens in the state with a Bachelor’s degree or higher. These days, it seems that a college education is necessary for any kind of career advancement. The lower this rate, the more likely it is that a college-educated individual may end up unemployed or underemployed.

7. Medicine Rate

When looking at health and medicine, it’s important to consider all of the factors. Health outcomes and benchmarks vary widely across the states and refer to the following factors like behaviors, social & economic points, physical environment points, clinical care, health outcomes points. Health could be physical, mental, and emotional, so it’s crucial to look at reliable resources. We referred to the United Health Foundation’s annual report.

8. Poverty Rate: % (the lower the better)

Taking data from the the U.S. Census Bureau, this list looks at which states have the highest incidences of wealth. It turns out that several of the states on this ranking are among the top ten richest in the country. This points to better housing, education, and health outcomes.

9. Natural Environment Rate

Something else to consider was the safety of the surrounding environment. Analyzing trends from the Environmental Protection Agency, it was easier to see which states were facing natural health risks. These include:

10. Infrastructure Rate

Modern Americans should also know how healthy their state’s infrastructure is. Believe it or not, these factors can greatly impact the overall quality of life. This data was taken from the Federal Highway Administration.

This includes things like:

To identify the best states to live in the U.S., each point was considered and meticulously revised for all the states. After gathering the reports, each state’s data was summarized and compiled into a spreadsheet. The individual states received rankings between 0 and 5 for each of the metrics.

It took time, but by the end, all of the states had a number rating for all of the categories. This would give them a maximum of 50 points, and this helped with organizing the states accordingly, as well as to give you a top 10 list.

Top 10 Best States to Live in the US

To find out what is the best state to live in, the points for each of the metrics were added up. This gave a final ranking to all 50 states, and the top 10 places were: Utah, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Maryland, Colorado, Washington, Virginia, Minnesota.

Below is more detailed information about each location’s demographics, crime, unemployment rates, and more.

#1 Utah

Utah was the 45th state to join the U.S., and it’s the 30th-largest in the country. It’s a great tourist spot, thanks to its four-way shared border with Arizona, New Mexico, and Wyoming. Utah also boasts lovely natural landscapes and five national parks. It’s known for hosting the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City.

Utah
  • Overall
  • Population
  • Income
  • Home Value
  • Crime
  • Unemployment
  • Education
  • Medicine
  • Poverty
  • Environment
  • Infrastructure

#1

Overall Rank

  • #30

    Population

    3,205,958

  • #8

    Income

    $68,358

  • #7

    Home Value

    $401,053

  • #16

    Crime

    7,553

  • #1

    Unemployment

    3.3%

  • #6

    Education

    32.5%

  • #6

    Medicine

    6 points

  • #3

    Poverty

    9.0%

  • #6

    Environment

    0 air violations

  • #3

    Infrastructure

    2.40%

#30

Data

3,205,958

Population

The population density in Utah is just 36.53 per square mile. This makes it the 30th most-populous state, placing it way behind many others. The majority of the population lives in and around Salt Lake City. There are very few people in the southwestern corner of the state.

#8

Income

$68,358

State Sales Tax

6.10%

Income

Utah’s median income is among the top 10 in the country. This means most households will not have to struggle to make a living or buy a new home. Plus, the state top individual tax is one of the lowest in the country, and the same happens with the property tax (around 0.64%).

#7

Data

$401,053

Home Value

Home values in Utah have gone up 13.3% in the past year, and it's a warm seller's market right now. The trend is expected to continue into 2021, rising another 10% or so. The median rent here is $1,525 per month.

#16

Violent Crime

7,553

Murder

72

Crime

This is the 16th-safest state in terms of crime rates. There were 7,553 acts of violence, including 72 murders and 1,822 rapes. This is still in the middle compared to all 50 states.

#1

Data

3.3%

Unemployment

At 3.3%, Utah takes the number-one spot in the country, along with South Dakota. The fastest-growing jobs in this state include vet tech, operations analyst, and software and Web developer. They will experience anywhere from 150% to 180% growth in the next five years.

#6

Data

32.5%

Education

Over 32% of Utah residents have a Bachelor’s degree, and 11% have gone on to complete an advanced degree like a Master’s. Plus, nearly 92% of people have at least a high school diploma. This sets the economy (and future homeowners) up for success.

#6

Health Outcomes

6 points

Clinical Care

25 points

Medicine

Utah is a wonderful place to live for people who are concerned about staying healthy and well. The state had only 2 negative behavioral health reports and 12 physical environment violations. This makes sense considering the fresh mountain air of this area.

#3

Data

9.0%

Poverty

The poverty rate in Utah isn't looking that great. The state has one of the highest percentages of young people, yet 10.63% of males and 8.96% of females are poor. These rates are most prevalent among Native Americans (27.08%) and Blacks (27.22%).

#6

Air

0 violations

Drinking Water

636 violations

Environment

It could be the salt lake or the fresh mountains, but Utah has one of the best environmental outcomes in the country. It had zero reports or violations for air quality and pesticide use. Its biggest problem was drinking water, which is in line with the national average but it isn’t very clean.

#3

Poor Roads

2.40%

Deficient Bridge

2.20%

Infrastructure

Utah’s roads and infrastructure are doing very well. The state has the fourth-lowest percentage of structurally deficient bridges, at just 2,2%. Poor street conditions have a prevalence rate of 2.4%, the ninth-lowest in the country. The average drive time to work is just 22 minutes.

#2 New Hampshire

This state sits comfortably in New England next to some other top picks on this list – Massachusetts, and Vermont. New Hampshire is quite interesting; its proximity to Quebec, Canada, brought many French-Canadians to the land back in the day. Today, about a quarter of the population has French-Canadian ancestry.

New Hampshire
  • Overall
  • Population
  • Income
  • Home Value
  • Crime
  • Unemployment
  • Education
  • Medicine
  • Poverty
  • Environment
  • Infrastructure

#2

Overall Rank

  • #41

    Population

    1,359,711

  • #20

    Income

    $73,381

  • #14

    Home Value

    $330,976

  • #3

    Crime

    2,074

  • #7

    Unemployment

    3.8%

  • #8

    Education

    36.0%

  • #9

    Medicine

    17 points

  • #1

    Poverty

    7.2%

  • #8

    Environment

    10 air violations

  • #29

    Infrastructure

    4.80%

#41

Data

1,359,711

Population

New Hampshire is the fifth-smallest state by area and the tenth least-populous, so people living there can have lots of space to themselves. The population density is 147 per square mile, and the majority of residents are White. The border it shares with Massachusetts is the most crowded part of the state.

#20

Income

$73,381

State Sales Tax

0%

Income

Lots of people make good money in New Hampshire. The economy is run by several massive medical and financial institutions. Moreover, the government employs about 61,000 people. The large majority of employees work in the private sector. Another tidbit is that the state has the eighth-highest percentage of millionaires in the U.S.

#14

Data

$330,976

Home Value

The state also boasts a decent household income. It's a hot seller's market right now, with property prices rising 8.9% in the past year. In 2021, experts predict this trend will continue, rising another 6-8%. The average rent in this state is $1,750 a month.

#3

Violent Crime

2,074

Murder

33

Crime

There were 317 violent acts committed in New Hampshire last year. That said, violence in this state isn’t as high as in other places. For instance, there were 65 robberies in New Hampshire, but 126 in New Jersey and 215 in Massachusetts.

#7

Data

3.8%

Unemployment

This state’s unemployment rate is the same as Colorado and Virginia. New Hampshire is a highly-educated state, being home to Dartmouth College, Franklin Pierce University, and several other educational institutions. Therefore, it makes sense that many residents pursue higher education and full-time employment.

#8

Data

36.0%

Education

Speaking of education, the state is in the top 10 for the percentage of residents with a Bachelor’s degree and/or advanced degree. Nearly 93% of people graduate high school, and 36% of them go on to finish college. An impressive 13.8% have a Master’s Ph.D., or other advanced degrees.

#9

Health Outcomes

17 points

Clinical Care

6 points

Medicine

New Hampshire lands in the top ten of the national rankings in terms of overall health and wellness. It had just five behavioral care reports and six in the clinical care category. In terms of health facilities, New Hampshire has more than 26 hospitals. The best-rated one is The Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon.

#1

Data

7.2%

Poverty

New Hampshire is among the top 10 richest states, yet it is not immune to poverty. Over 6.75% of males and over 8.35% of females are poor. This statistic is highest among blacks (19.82%) and Hispanics (16.4%), just between those two racial groups, that is nearly 11,689 people living in poverty.

#8

Air

10 violations

Drinking Water

753 violations

Environment

New Hampshire made it to the top 10 in terms of environmental health. It had a very low number of hazardous waste and water quality violations, which is great for residents. However, the state has some work to do with its drinking water, which is below average in terms of safety.

#29

Poor Roads

4.80%

Deficient

9.00%

Infrastructure

New Hampshire is within the average percentage for structurally-compromised bridges (9%) and poor road conditions (4.8%). Drivers spend $422 highway dollars per year, on average. Also, the state has the 11th-highest commute time, at 27.3 minutes.

#3 Massachusetts

This rather small state covers just 10,565 square miles, but it’s got one of the highest population densities in the country. Dotted with beautiful bays and rivers, it boasts coastal plains, busy cities, rolling hills, and the Cape Cod peninsula. According to the key metrics above, Massachusetts comes out as one of the best states in the U.S. to live.

Massachusett
  • Overall
  • Population
  • Income
  • Home Value
  • Crime
  • Unemployment
  • Education
  • Medicine
  • Poverty
  • Environment
  • Infrastructure

#3

Overall Rank

  • #15

    Population

    6,892,503

  • #29

    Income

    $77,385

  • #3

    Home Value

    $474,673

  • #7

    Crime

    22,578

  • #46

    Unemployment

    8.4%

  • #1

    Education

    42.1%

  • #2

    Medicine

    2 points

  • #9

    Poverty

    9.9%

  • #34

    Environment

    42 air violations

  • #45

    Infrastructure

    15.40%

#15

Data

6,892,503

Population

It has the 15th-largest in the nation, at 840 square miles. Within Massachusetts, the cities with the highest densities include Somerville, Chelsea, Allston, Brighton, and Boston. For instance, Boston has 14,482 people per square mile and a total population of 6,902,149 people.

#29

Income

$77,385

State Sales Tax

6.25%

Income

Massachusetts is a great place to go to have a comfortable and approachable median household income. This figure signifies that the average family is doing quite well for themselves. Also, keep in mind that this number is adjusted for inflation.

#3

Data

$474,673

Home Value

This moderately high figure is not very consistent with the average household income. In the past year, Massachusetts’ home values have increased by over 10.4% and are expected to rise again in 2021.

#7

Violent Crime

22,578

Murder

152

Crime

When looking at criminal activity, Massachusetts experienced 3,613 robberies and 12,341 burglaries last year. The Springfield Metropolitan area in the west is one of the most dangerous parts. Cities like Holyoke, North Adams, and Springfield have Massachusetts’ highest number of incidents. Boston isn’t the safest either, so don’t be surprised to see it on the news.

#46

Data

8.4%

Unemployment

The overall unemployment rate in Massachusetts is not really good. This is the forty-six-lowest in the whole country. Remember that unemployment refers to people who can work and are available for a job but can’t obtain one, either because they can’t find employment or no one is hiring them.

#1

Data

42.1%

Education

Massachusetts is fairly average when it comes to having an educated population. Despite being home to college towns, less than half of the population has a Bachelor’s degree or higher.

#2

Health Outcomes

2 points

Clinical Care

1 points

Medicine

The state surpassed most of the country across the board. It had just one negative clinical care report and seven for social and economic factors. It also had nine behavior reports, which was one of the best in the country. This means that Massachusetts is one of the safest and healthiest for people of all ages.

#9

Data

9.9%

Poverty

Poverty is defined as not having the economic means to meet basic needs such as food, water, and shelter. Here, more females than males belong to this statistic, and the most prevalent ethnic group in this metric is Hispanics, followed by Native Americans.

#34

Air

42 violations

Drinking Water

444 violations

Environment

Massachusetts was a poor performer in the hazardous waste category, with hundreds of violations. The state did better in terms of drinking water and overall water quality, though. Unfortunately, it sits in the bottom half of the national rankings for most environmental factors, posing lots of environmental health risks.

#45

Poor Roads

15.40%

Deficient Bridge

9.20%

Infrastructure

#4 Maryland

Maryland is right in the north of the country and is part of the first 19 colonies. While it’s not the richer state or the most populated, it has other great indicators that make it a good place to live. For example, the number of educated people is elevated, and the poverty rate is low.

Maryland
  • Overall
  • Population
  • Income
  • Home Value
  • Crime
  • Unemployment
  • Education
  • Medicine
  • Poverty
  • Environment
  • Infrastructure

#4

Overall Rank

  • #19

    Population

    6,045,680

  • #19

    Income

    80,776

  • #11

    Home Value

    $341,148

  • #34

    Crime

    27,456

  • #34

    Unemployment

    6.8%

  • #3

    Education

    39.0%

  • #7

    Medicine

    8 points

  • #2

    Poverty

    8.9%

  • #10

    Environment

    9 air violations

  • #30

    Infrastructure

    9.20%

#19

Data

6,045,680

Population

While Maryland is in the 19th place on the list, it has quite a lot of inhabitants considering its size (for instance, compared to New Hampshire). This may happen because the cost of living is elevated. Plus, it’s not that easy to get a good job without a graduate degree.

#19

Income

80,776

State Sales Tax

6.00%

Income

The median home income is decent, especially when considering the price of the property or of food. Most people here have higher education and are able to work in their career of choice. In terms of taxes, people have to pay 5.75% top income tax while the local tax burden is around 10%.

#11

Data

$341,148

Home Value

While MD is one of the places with the highest wages, homes are not that expensive. This means that, in a few years, people can buy their own house or apartment by saving or asking for a loan. The most expensive place to purchase is the Chesapeake Bay.

#34

Violent Crime

27,456

Murder

542

Crime

Violent crime numbers are high here, unfortunately. So are other illegal actions such as robbery (9,203) or aggravated assault (15,798). In terms of murders, the numbers are quite decent. Some areas to avoid include Baltimore or Elkton. Instead, the most peaceful cities are Ocean Pines and Taneytown.

#34

Data

6.8%

Unemployment

While Maryland is a rich state, the unemployment rate is a bit high. For example, it cannot compete with better provinces like Uta, South Dakota, or Nebraska, which are under 4%. The rate is a bit above the national average, but this happens due to the coronavirus pandemic.

#3

Data

39.0%

Education

Again, MD does great when it comes to education. It has excellent higher education institutions, such as Towson, John Hopkins, and the University of Maryland. Most people here, then, at least have a bachelor's degree. This also makes it difficult for those who don't have the education to find a decent job.

#7

Health Outcomes

8 points

Clinical Care

10 points

Medicine

MD ranks 7 in the whole country, which is good. As regards hospitals and centers, Maryland has quite a good number to attend to all the inhabitants. For example, there are 72 hospitals, and 13 of them are from the government. Plus, medical attention at clinics is quite decent, scoring 10 points.

#2

Data

8.9%

Poverty

This province is one of the least poor in the country. Then, it's rare to find homeless people or others struggling to survive, eat, or pay the bills. Plus, the state supports those who, for some reason was not able to finish school by giving them incentives to do so.

#10

Air

9 air violations

Drinking Water

403 violations

Environment

In terms of the natural environment, the air is quite good to breathe. The number of violations is low, especially when compared with other industrial provinces in the north. The water, instead, is a bit poor quality. It’s among the least safe in the country, and it’s better to drink from a bottle.

#30

Poor Roads

9.20%

Deficient Bridge

5.10%

Infrastructure

Considering highways and bridges, the gap is big. While most bridges are in fine condition, the highways are not the same. However, people’s usual road spending is low, which shows that the government strives to keep them in a good state, despite the patches.

#5 Colorado

Colorado is known for its fresh mountain air, lots of forests and greenery, and people with a love for the outdoors. It is a landlocked region that offers some of the best views in the world, such as the Rocky Mountains, the Colorado River, the Great Plains, and the Colorado Plateau. The state is bordered by Wyoming, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Utah, and Arizona. Its climate ranges from the Mediterranean to the subtropical to the cold desert.

Colorado
  • Overall
  • Population
  • Income
  • Home Value
  • Crime
  • Unemployment
  • Education
  • Medicine
  • Poverty
  • Environment
  • Infrastructure

#5

Overall Rank

  • #21

    Population

    5,758,736

  • #2

    Income

    $69,117

  • #5

    Home Value

    $442,766

  • #36

    Crime

    21,938

  • #36

    Unemployment

    6.9%

  • #3

    Education

    39.4%

  • #3

    Medicine

    9 points

  • #6

    Poverty

    9.6%

  • #31

    Environment

    72 air violations

  • #23

    Infrastructure

    5.90%

#21

Data

5,758,736

Population

The total population of Colorado is mostly scattered among metropolitan areas. Its population density is 52 per square mile and is #21 in the United States. The majority of residents are located in the central northern area of the region, which is where Boulder, Colorado Springs, and Denver are located.

#2

Income

$69,117

State Sales Tax

2.90%

Income

The average take-home income here is the twelfth-highest in the country. Colorado’s economy depends on things like the federal government and the United States Air Force Academy. Colorado is also great for business and is home to companies such as Coors, Russel Stover, and Samsonite.

#5

Data

$442,766

Home Value

In this area, the home buying market is neutral, with the average household value rising nearly 8.6% in the last year. It is expected to increase by another 4% or so in 2021. The average rent here is $2,000 per month.

#36

Violent Crime

21,938

Murder

218

Crime

Colorado is not the most dangerous state in the country, but it's not the safest either. Just last year, there were 3,663 robberies and 20,064 burglaries. There were also 21,938 violent crimes in 2019. Colorado and Denver, in particular, were home to famous crimes, such as the murder of JonBenét Ramsey (whose DNA was found in 2016). Plus, in 2020 only, Colorado was home to more than 11 mass shootings.

#36

Data

6.9%

Unemployment

The rate of unemployment in Colorado ranks #36 and ties with Arizona and Maryland. Unemployment has soared in the last few years, especially due to the COVID-19 restrictions that caused businesses to close. The most affected areas were leisure, tourism, and hospitality.

#3

Data

39.4%

Education

This state has the third-highest number of residents with a Bachelor’s degree or higher. Also, 91.1% of residents have a high school diploma, and 14.6% have an advanced college degree.

#3

Health Outcomes

9 points

Clinical Care

17 points

Medicine

Colorado is also in the top ten in terms of wellness. It consistently had great wellness outcomes everywhere. Only in social and economic terms, it had 13 reports. This state had one of the lowest numbers of violations in the health outcomes category, with just nine. This might be due to the more active communities in this state.

#6

Data

9.6%

Poverty

The percentage of Colorado residents who are living in poverty reflects 9.44% of males and 11.18% of females. The ethnic group most likely to experience poverty in this region is Native Americans, at 19.45%. Blacks have a poverty rate of 17.71%, Hispanics are at 16.24%, and Whites are at 7.84%, the lowest in the area.

#31

Air

72 air violations

Drinking Water

692 violations

Environment

Somewhat surprisingly, Colorado came in at #31 nationally in this metric. It did the worst in terms of air quality, racking up 72 negative reports. It also had 692 drinking water violations and 405 water quality reports. That said, there were only seven pesticide violations.

#23

Poor Roads

5.90%

Deficient Bridge

5.40%%

Infrastructure

Perhaps because of its mountainous terrain, there aren't too many highways to deal with in Colorado. Road spending per driver is $305, which is the seventh-lowest in the country. Nearly 6% of the roads are in poor conditions, and 5.4% of the bridges aren't structurally sound.

#6 Washington

In the very Northwest of the country lies Washington, a cold and wet state that offers a great quality of life. It has diverse landscapes and geography, with the famous Cascade mountains and the beautiful forests bordering Seattle. That is the biggest city, though it’s not the capital (Olympia). People can visit many interesting places such as the Space Needle and the Pike Place Market.

Washington
  • Overall
  • Population
  • Income
  • Home Value
  • Crime
  • Unemployment
  • Education
  • Medicine
  • Poverty
  • Environment
  • Infrastructure

#6

Overall Rank

  • #13

    Population

    7,614,893

  • #4

    Income

    $70,979

  • #4

    Home Value

    $470,304

  • #35

    Crime

    22,377

  • #30

    Unemployment

    6.3%

  • #11

    Education

    34.5%

  • #8

    Medicine

    13 points

  • #11

    Poverty

    10.1%

  • #37

    Environment

    15 air violations

  • #31

    Infrastructure

    10.70%

#13

Data

7,614,893

Population

Washington is among the first 15 most populated states. This is the reflection of fairly good wages and education opportunities. The cities with the most inhabitants here include Seattle (the capital), Spokane, and Tacoma.

#4

Income

$70,979

State Sales Tax

6.50%

Income

The median income per home is high in this state, one of the best in the USA. It is even higher than other expensive places such as Hawaii or Alaska. In regards to the taxes individuals have to pay, the rates are 9.3% for the local burden, and there’s no personal income tax, which is great.

#4

Data

$470,304

Home Value

Homes in Washington are really expensive, being in the top 5 of the country. People will need almost half a million dollars, on average, if they want to own their house or apartment. This is even more pricey than New York or New Jersey, for example, although it’s double the price of places like Illinois.

#35

Violent Crime

22,377

Murder

198

Crime

Washington is relatively peaceful in some places and regarding some crimes, but the same does not apply to other sectors. For example, the violent crime rate is high, in particular, when considering Wyoming or Vermont. The most dangerous cities here include Tukwila, Fife, and Tacoma.

#30

Data

6.3%

Unemployment

Although the state is quite rich and moves a lot of money, almost 7% of the population are left aside from the job market. This happens mainly because some cities, like Krupp or Beaux Art Village, are too small to offer professional opportunities suitable for the quality of living in the province.

#11

Data

34.5%

Education

Education in Washington is good, and this shows in the 35% of the population who have a Bachelor’s degree or higher. These people usually study in institutions outside the area. But the most reputable ones here include the University of Washington or Seattle Pacific.

#8

Health Outcomes

13 points

Clinical Care

14 points

Medicine

In terms of medicine, Washington is among the top 10 of the United States. Only 13% of the population has no insurance, which means that 87% are able to afford expensive medical treatment without the help of the government. Plus, there are great care centers like EverGreenHealth or Virginia Mason Medical Center.

#11

Data

10.1%

Poverty

The poverty metric in WA is fairly acceptable, with only 10% of the working population without a decent position. The ones that have it harder are families with children but with only one working parent. More than 20% of them are below the poverty line and struggle to make a living.

#37

Air

15 air violations

Drinking Water

826 violations

Environment

The air in WA is of good quality because there are not so many violations by companies or industries. Water, instead, is not so good. Tap water can be unreliable in certain sections of the province, and the government recommends buying bottles or at least water filters instead.

#31

Poor Roads

10.70%

Deficient Bridge

4.60%

Infrastructure

The roads in poor condition here are many, and this results in drivers having to spend a lot of money per year on reparations. Yet, the situation is reversed when considering bridges, such as the very high Tacoma Bridge or the Highsteel Bridge.

#7 Virginia

They say Virginia is for lovers, and maybe that’s because of its natural beauty. From the Chesapeake Bay to the Blue Ridge Mountains and coastlines of beaches, this area has something to offer everyone. Half of its land is covered in forests, and it’s just a short drive away from the nation’s capital, District of Columbia. Besides its geography, it offers a safe location for families to call home.

Virginia
  • Overall
  • Population
  • Income
  • Home Value
  • Crime
  • Unemployment
  • Education
  • Medicine
  • Poverty
  • Environment
  • Infrastructure

#7

Overall Rank

  • #12

    Population

    8,535,519

  • #7

    Income

    $71,535

  • #17

    Home Value

    $307,964

  • #9

    Crime

    17,753

  • #22

    Unemployment

    5.6%

  • #6

    Education

    37.6%

  • #13

    Medicine

    21 points

  • #10

    Poverty

    10.1%

  • #25

    Environment

    35 air violations

  • #11

    Infrastructure

    2.70%

#12

Data

8,535,519

Population

The total population density is 206.7 square miles. There are 11 major Metropolitan areas in Virginia, with Fairfax being the most populous with over one million residents. The most densely populated cities sit along the Eastern side of the state.

#7

Income

$71,535

State Sales Tax

5.30%

Income

It seems that both single-earner and dual-earner households are doing quite well for themselves here. The economy is driven by farming and agriculture, military, and local businesses. Arlington, Virginia, is home to the Pentagon, which houses the Department of Defense.

#17

Data

$307,964

Home Value

The average value of a home property in Virginia grew 7.8% over the past year. The housing market in Virginia is red-hot and is expected to continue growing into 2021. The median rent here is $1,700 per month.

#9

Violent Crime

17,753

Murder

426

Crime

Virginia’s crime rate is falling, and the state is getting closer to the top 10 in the country. Even so, there were 3,524 robberies and 13,900 burglaries last year. In terms of the most dangerous places within the province, these are Norfolk (with over 1,000 crimes) and Richmond (with a lot of property crimes). Plus, Chesapeake and Newport are not known as being the most peaceful.

#22

Data

5.6%

Unemployment

Virginia ranks #22 in unemployment, and the job opportunities here include some 900,000 governmental careers, such as the CIA, Department of Defense, National Science Foundation, and U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. The area also has the highest concentration of technology workers.

#6

Data

37.6%

Education

Virginia has a decent number of residents with a Bachelor’s degree and compared to all the other states in the nation. It is one of the top 10 most educated states. As for residents with an advanced degree, 16.1% of the population has a Master’s Ph.D. or doctorate.

#13

Health Outcomes

21 points

Clinical Care

20 points

Medicine

Virginia is between the first 15 states in terms of the quality of health. For instance, the rate of uninsured is around 20%, which means that almost 80% of the rest have a good job that supports their medical treatments. The best-rated hospital in the region is the Select Speciality in Newport.

#10

Data

10.1%

Poverty

The poverty indicator here is around 10%, which is quite decent. People prone to be poor are single mothers and families with just one working member without higher education. Today, Farmville is considered to be the poorest city in Virginia, with an average salary that is way below the national one.

#25

Air

35 violations

Drinking Water

520 violations

Environment

Virginia sits right in the middle of the country in terms of how healthy its environment is according to violations. Its drinking water and air quality are just average, so it’s still something that can improve. The state did better with pesticide use and had zero serious negative reports.

#11

Poor Roads

2.70%

Deficient Bridge

4.60%

Infrastructure

Unfortunately, Virginia falls short in the infrastructure category, with some of the worst traffic and highway construction in the country. About 2.7% of the roads are in poor condition, and 4.6% of the bridges are structurally deficient. The state has the eighth-highest commute time to work, at 28.6 minutes.

#8 Minnesota

This region sits near the Great Lakes of North America and is also surrounded by forests and prairies. It’s the second northernmost state in the U.S., behind Alaska. Its borders include Lake Superior, Wisconsin, Iowa, North Dakota, South Dakota, as well as Manitoba and Ontario in Canada. Winters are extremely cold, and summers are hot, but there is a lot of beauty in Minnesota, which is what keeps people living there.

Minnesota
  • Overall
  • Population
  • Income
  • Home Value
  • Crime
  • Unemployment
  • Education
  • Medicine
  • Poverty
  • Environment
  • Infrastructure

#8

Overall Rank

  • #22

    Population

    5,639,632

  • #49

    Income

    $68,388

  • #21

    Home Value

    $283,127

  • #19

    Crime

    13,332

  • #16

    Unemployment

    4.7%

  • #10

    Education

    34.8%

  • #1

    Medicine

    7 points

  • #4

    Poverty

    9.2%

  • #27

    Environment

    37 air violations

  • #15

    Infrastructure

    4.10%

#22

Data

5,639,632

Population

This state has a total population density of 68.9 per square miles. Minnesota began growing once white settlers landed there in the 1850s. Since then, more people have moved to the state, with each century bringing a million or more residents.

#49

Income

$68,388

State Sales Tax

6.88%

Income

Minnesota’s economy is driven by products and service manufacturing, although it has a long history of mining and working with raw materials. Today, companies like 3M, General Mills, Hormel, Land O’ Lakes, Target, and United Health Group are based in this state.

#21

Data

$283,127

Home Value

The average home in Minnesota experienced nearly an 8% increase over last year. Prices are expected to rise another 4% or so in 2021. It’s a hot seller’s market right now, and most people live in the Minneapolis area in southeast Minnesota. The median rent is $1,600 per month.

#19

Violent Crime

13,332

Murder

117

Crime

The state experienced 3,149 robberies and 15,927 burglaries in the last year. The number of murders is 117, which is better than several of the states on this list. There were still 13,332 violent crimes in 2019. The most dangerous cities in Minnesota are Bemidji, Virginia, Brainerd, Minneapolis, and West Saint Paul.

#16

Data

4.7%

Unemployment

The percentage of unemployed people in Minnesota as of 2021 is in the middle of the road for the United States. Given that much of the economy relies on higher-level jobs like executives and technology workers, it is easy to see how some 187,000 people are without job security.

#10

Data

34.8%

Education

On the other hand, out of all Minnesota residents, over a quarter of them have a Bachelor’s degree or higher. That is the eleventh-highest in the whole country. Also, 11.8% of people in the state have an advanced degree, and 92.8% of them have a high school diploma.

#1

Health Outcomes

7 points

Clinical Care

4 points

Medicine

Minnesota was a consistent winner across the board. It had one of the lowest numbers of negative reports in terms of health outcomes, at just seven. Where it struggled was in behavior and clinical care, as it got 21 and 20 violations appropriately. That said, it had just 8 in terms of social and economic factors.

#4

Data

9.2%

Poverty

The state’s rate of poverty is on the lower end compared to other states. Over 8.77% of those under the poverty line are male, and over 10.56% are female. Blacks are the ethnic group most likely to experience poverty, at 28.57%. This is followed by Native Americans (31.27%) and Hispanics (18.60%).

#27

Air

37 violations

Drinking Water

188 violations

Environment

Sitting among the middle of the rankings, Minnesota struggled the most in terms of pesticide use. It also did poorly in the air quality category, falling a bit below the national average. Its best performance was regarding water quality and the overall safety of drinking water.

#15

Poor Roads

4.10%

Deficient Bridge

5.00%

Infrastructure

Minnesota’s roads and infrastructure are better than half of the country. Only 4% of the streets are in poor condition and just 5% of bridges. Drivers do spend $555, on average, in highway costs, though. Still, their median commute time is just 23.8 minutes.

#9 North Dakota

North Dakota is a very big state with different opportunities for those who want to live in the city or on a farm. The main universities and educational centers are located near the area of Grand Forks. Plus, the economy is based on petrol and agriculture, though there are some financial institutions working successfully here.

North Dakota
  • Overall
  • Population
  • Income
  • Home Value
  • Crime
  • Unemployment
  • Education
  • Medicine
  • Poverty
  • Environment
  • Infrastructure

#9

Overall Rank

  • #47

    Population

    762,062

  • #3

    Income

    $61,843

  • #26

    Home Value

    $239,464

  • #18

    Crime

    2,169

  • #13

    Unemployment

    4.7%

  • #28

    Education

    28.9%

  • #11

    Medicine

    16 points

  • #12

    Poverty

    10.2%

  • #1

    Environment

    0 air violations

  • #6

    Infrastructure

    2.20%

#47

Data

762,062

Population

When it comes to population, North Dakota doesn’t have a lot of people. This mainly happens because the area covered by the state is huge. Plus, it doesn’t have a lot of cities. The inhabitants, then, are scattered in rural areas. The main crops include wheat and corn.

#3

Income

$61,843

State Sales Tax

5.00%

Income

Even if North Dakota doesn’t have a lot of people, the ones who live there are able to make a living. The median home income is adequate, especially when taking taxes into account. These include the income tax of 2.9%, and the local burden is around 9%. The major industries include the energy sector and tourism.

#26

Data

$239,464

Home Value

The value of homes is not really in line with most wages here. As a result, only those with a high salary will be able to afford their own house in a few years. The rest will have to ask for an expensive loan from the bank and get a mortgage.

#18

Violent Crime

2,169

Murder

24

Crime

In regards to the crime rate, there are certain cities where violence incidence is high. For example, Fargo or Mandan have some dangerous neighborhoods where arson or crime against property occur. Conversely, the number of murders is quite low, and so are the rates of rape.

#13

Data

4.7%

Unemployment

This is not particularly a rich province, but the unemployment indicator is quite good. It means that people do not usually have problems when finding a job that allows them to make a living. Usually, this happens because there is a lot of rural work to be done on farms and plantations.

#28

Data

28.9%

Education

Almost 30% of the population has some kind of university degree, which is good when taking opportunities into consideration. Those who live in rural areas don’t need a Bachelor’s to have access to a nice job. That is why the unemployment indicator is so low when compared to this one.

#11

Health Outcomes

16 points

Clinical Care

18 points

Medicine

Almost 20% of people don’t have private health insurance. This means that they cannot find a job that pays for them or that they cannot afford it on their own. As a result, there is some strain in the public system that showed when the coronavirus pandemic hit in 2020 and 2021.

#12

Data

10.2%

Poverty

Only 10% of the population is poor in the state. Yet, almost 30,000 children receive food stamps and federal rental assistance. Plus, almost 7% of households don’t have a bank account, so it’s hard to keep track of their expenses and earnings.

#1

Air

0 air violations

Drinking Water

100 violations

Environment

The natural environment of this area is excellent. For example, the air has no violations, which means it’s of top quality and poses no risk to one’s health. Something similar happens to the water, which is safe to drink from the tap instead of from the bottle.

#6

Poor Roads

2.20%

Deficient Bridge

10.80%

Infrastructure

When it comes to urban infrastructure, this province has a gap between bridges and roads. While highways are well maintained and cause almost no issue, the same doesn’t happen with the bridges. More than 10% of them, including the Missouri River Bridge or the Sorlie Memorial, can improve their condition.

#10 Vermont

Vermont is the sixth smallest state, at least by area. Interestingly, its most populated city can’t even match other top cities in the U.S. Of course, the state has a lot going for it. Nature, the indigenous tribes, and Vermont is the leading producer of maple syrup.

Vermont
  • Overall
  • Population
  • Income
  • Home Value
  • Crime
  • Unemployment
  • Education
  • Medicine
  • Poverty
  • Environment
  • Infrastructure

#10

Overall Rank

  • #49

    Population

    623,989

  • #50

    Income

    $57,513

  • #22

    Home Value

    $277,364

  • #2

    Crime

    1,262

  • #4

    Unemployment

    3.5%

  • #7

    Education

    36.8%

  • #4

    Medicine

    12 points

  • #13

    Poverty

    10.5%

  • #7

    Environment

    air violations

  • #5

    Infrastructure

    3,50%

#49

Data

623,989

Population

Vermont's population is noticeably smaller than other states, which makes sense considering it’s just 9,616 square miles. The density is 67.7 per square mile, and most people live in the northwest part of the state. Burlington is the most populous city, with over 42,545 residents.

#50

Income

$57,513

State Sales Tax

6.00%

Income

The average household earnings in Vermont are okay. Over 262,000 people are employed in this state, Government jobs account for over 13% of Vermont’s gross state product, and real estate makes up another 11%. This is followed by manufacturing, healthcare, and retail.

#22

Data

$277,364

Home Value

It's a hot seller's market in Vermont right now, and home values have risen 6.1% in the past year. Experts predict this growth will continue into 2021, at about 4.1%. While the expansion is great, the price to buy a piece of property is a bit steep.

#2

Violent Crime

1,262

Murder

11

Crime

Vermont is one of the provinces with the least crimes in the whole territory. The murder rate, for example, is ten times lower than in Kansas and 100 times lower than in California. Even so, Saint Albans, Brattleboro, and Montpelier are the most dangerous cities within the state.

#4

Data

3.5%

Unemployment

This state has one of the lowest unemployment rates in the entire United States, at 3.5%. It is 0.2% more the best-rated state here, Utah. The most popular jobs in Vermont center around the sales sector, such as cashier or retail representative. This is followed by registered nurses.

#7

Data

36.8%

Education

Vermont has a highly educated population. Nearly 37% of residents have a college degree, and 15% have a Master’s, Ph.D., or Doctorate. The state has the seventh-highest number of high school and university graduates in the country.

#4

Health Outcomes

12 points

Clinical Care

3 points

Medicine

Vermont got high marks in every wellness-related category. Where it struggled, the most was in terms of the overall physical environment. It had 20 violations in this category, but that's still better than many of the other states. It had just 3 and 1 negative reports in clinical care and behavior accordingly.

#13

Data

10.5%

Poverty

Vermont is one of the richest states in the country, yet 9.97% of men and 11.90% of women experience poverty there. Blacks and Native Americans are the two racial groups that live in destitute conditions (25,95% and 17.72% for each group accordingly). Pacific Islanders are least likely to be poor, coming in at 5.99%.

#7

Air

violations

Drinking Water

violations

Environment

Vermont landed in the top 10 nationally in terms of its natural environment. It had zero air quality reports and no pesticide violations. It struggled with hazardous waste, racking up an average number of violations. On a positive note, the state’s water quality is quite good compared to the rest of the country.

#5

Poor Roads

3,50%

Deficient Bridge

2,40%

Infrastructure

Vermont is among the best in terms of infrastructure, coming in only behind Nevada, Florida, Utah, and Arizona. Not bad for a state that’s on the other side of the country. Only 3.5% of roads and 2.4% of the bridges in the state are structurally deficient. The average commute time is 23.2 minutes.

Best vs. Worst States By Top 10 Key Criteria

To find the best states to live in the U.S., we had to look at several critical points that would accurately reflect the health, wealth, and atmosphere of each region. This included things like crime rate, average household income, unemployment, and percentage of residents with a college degree. Other crucial components focused on external factors like health outcomes, infrastructure, and environment.

Just as we found the top-performing states for these key metrics, we could also see which areas were lacking. The worst states were those that had more negative health and wellness outcomes, lower-earning and less-educated communities, and spikes in unemployment, crime, and poverty. Since every state has its weak points, we were sure to evenly weigh each metric to get a more accurate representation of the states’ standard of living.

  • Population

    Population

    1. California
    2. Texas
    3. Florida
    4. New York
    5. Pennsylvania
    1. South Dakota
    2. North Dakota
    3. Alaska
    4. Vermont
    5. Wyoming
  • Median Income

    Median Income

    1. Wyoming
    2. Colorado
    3. North Dakota
    4. Washington
    5. Hawaii
    1. Iowa
    2. Maine
    3. New Jersey
    4. Minnesota
    5. Vermont
  • Home Value

    Home Value

    1. Hawaii
    2. California
    3. Massachusetts
    4. Washington
    5. Colorado
    1. Alabama
    2. Arkansas
    3. Oklahoma
    4. Mississippi
    5. West Virginia
  • Crime Rate

    Crime Rate

    1. Maine
    2. Vermont
    3. New Hampshire
    4. Idaho
    5. New Jersey
    1. Arkansas
    2. Missouri
    3. New Mexico
    4. Louisiana
    5. Alaska
  • Unemployment Rate

    Unemployment Rate

    1. Utah
    2. South Dakota
    3. Nebraska
    4. Vermont
    5. Iowa
    1. Massachusetts
    2. New Mexico
    3. New York
    4. California
    5. Hawaii
  • Education

    Education

    1. Massachusetts
    2. Colorado
    3. Maryland
    4. Connecticut
    5. New Jersey
    1. Louisiana
    2. Kentucky
    3. Arkansas
    4. Mississippi
    5. West Virginia
  • Medicine

    Medicine

    1. Minnesota
    2. Massachusetts
    3. Colorado
    4. Vermont
    5. Hawaii
    1. Alabama
    2. West Virginia
    3. Louisiana
    4. Oklahoma
    5. Mississippi
  • Poverty

    Poverty

    1. New Hampshire
    2. Maryland
    3. Utah
    4. Minnesota
    5. Hawaii
    1. Kentucky
    2. West Virginia
    3. New Mexico
    4. Louisiana
    5. Mississippi
  • Natural Environment

    Natural Environment

    1. North Dakota
    2. South Dakota
    3. Delaware
    4. Hawaii
    5. Nebraska
    1. Illinois
    2. Ohio
    3. California
    4. Pennsylvania
    5. Texas
  • Infrastructure

    Infrastructure

    1. Nevada
    2. Florida
    3. Utah
    4. Arizona
    5. Vermont
    1. New Jersey
    2. West Virginia
    3. Iowa
    4. Alaska
    5. Rhode Island

FAQ Section

  • What is the Best State to Live in 2021?

    This will ultimately depend on the person. Everyone will have their own opinion of what is the best state to live in, and they’ll weigh different factors more heavily. For instance, the crime rate might be the most important, or maybe home values or median household income. There is a variety of data to consider, which is why this list can help. Some states boast an educated population and low unemployment but higher costs of living. There is always going to be a trade-off.

  • Which State is the Cheapest to Live in?

    The bad news is that there isn’t one single answer. The good news is that there are great places to live across the U.S. It depends on several critical factors such as medicine and wellness policies, environmental health, poverty, and employment opportunities. While no individual state will perform highly in all metrics, there are regions throughout the nation that provide plenty of jobs, affordable housing, and relatively low crime. There’s no perfect location, but there’s surely a suitable state or city for any family.

  • How Many Murders in U.S. Per Year?

    The average rate of murders in the United States is 5.3 per 100,000 people per year. This figure is modified year by year. This means that every 12 months, the number decreases or increases depending on the murders committed during the period. Instead of looking at the U.S. as a whole, it can help to look at the states with the highest murder rates. This data comes from 2019 and lists the ten worst states for violent crime.

  • What City in the U.S. Has the Highest Murder Rate?

    Large cities in the USA are typically known for having high violence rates, especially when it comes to crime. It’s easy to see what the safest big cities in the U.S. are when taking a look at official data. For instance, New York has a high incidence of violent crimes in the areas of the Bronx and other neighborhoods in NYC.

    Other unsafe cities in the country are:

    • East St. Louis in the state of Illinois. This place has a lot of pollution, and this contributes to low intelligence and higher violence.
    • Gary, in Indiana.
    • St. Louis in Missouri.

  • What Are the Top 10 Safest Cities in the United States?

    While some states may be violent overall, this doesn’t mean there cannot be peaceful cities in the territory. In fact, many of them arise in places that have high crime indicators as a whole. Some of the factors that contribute to safety have to do with education, job opportunities, income, access to health, and more. So, the top ten safest cities include the following.

  • What is the Healthiest State in America?

    Minnesota and Massachusetts are two of the healthiest states in the country. This response to some clear indicators, such as the obesity rate (which is quite low), the quality of the air, and the water. Plus, the clinical care in these areas is superior to others, while the rate of smokers is also decreasing. Also, the median income per family in MA is great. Most people there have efficient health insurance or are able to afford treatment on their own. In Minnesota, public spending on health is high (with 1.4 billion annually).

  • What is the Rudest State in America?

    The rudest state in the country has a close relationship with the violent crime rates every 100,000 inhabitants. To come up with the following list, we calculated this metric and gave each group of states a score that went from 1 to 5. In terms of violent crime, then, the following are the 5 rudest states (calculations are per 100,000 people).

    But if the murder metric is at stake, these are the 5 worst of the USA:

Which State Comes Out on Top?

At the end of the day, it is up to homeowners to decide where they want to live. They can’t go by pretty Facebook pictures but instead need to look at things like safety and privacy. Crime is one of the key factors to look at, but there are also things like schools, jobs, and the cost of living. This top ten list shows which states stand out in general when the averages of all those factors are considered. They range from the Pacific Northwest to the Eastern Seaboard to the Midwestern U.S. There is a place for everyone, and while it might take some time to find the perfect fit, it’s worth it.


Brad Smith

Editorial Staff

Brad has worked as a sales manager in the security sector for 10 years. He is curious, attentive to details, and hard-working. He has dedicated several years to helping customers with their safety and protection. His background has helped Brad to write comprehensive security and life safety materials, which he has been writing for about 4 years. Brad has contributed work to The Washington Post, DailyJournal, Los Angeles Times, and many others.


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